What is depression? The black dog.

DEPRESSION: Seek help

depression

 

Winston Churchill referred to his depression as his “black dog”. Today you can learn about this mood disorder through resources from the BLACK DOG INSTITUTE. See

www.blackdoginstitute.org.au

Everyone feels a bit low at times. For example, having a bad day at work can affect one’s mood. Generally we “bounce back” and move on. People with depression do not have that ability to bounce back and can become overwhelmed by pessimism, anxiety, irritability, anger and guilt. They cannot function normally at home or work.

The most severe depression is called a”major depressive episode”. This involves being extremely depressed for at least two weeks. Some of the symptoms are as follows:

* feeling depressed (sad or empty) most of the day, nearly every day

*loss of interest or pleasure in all activities most of the day, nearly every day

*reduced motivation

*significant weight loss

*decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.

* insomnia nearly every day

*fatigue nearly every day

*agitation or feelings of being slowed down

*feelings of worthlessness every day

*difficulties with concentration and memory

*indecisivenes

*lowered ability to control emotions such as anger, anxiety and pessimism

*thoughts about suicide

IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE DEPRESSION SEEK THE ADVICE OF A MEDICAL PRACTITIONER. A GOOD PLACE TO START IN GETTING HELP IS TO VISIT YOUR GENERAL PRACTITIONER (GP).

IF YOU ARE FEELING SUICIDAL IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO SEEK HELP IMMEDIATELY, preferably from a mental health practitioner.

A 24/7 emergency telephone number is Lifeline. Call 13 11 14

YOU ARE NOT ALONE…seek help for your depression.

 

depression-castle-hill

 

According to Paul Gilbert, the key symptom of depression is “anhedonia” derived from the ancient Greek meaning “without pleasure”; it means the loss of capacity to experience any pleasure.

Paul Gilbert (2000) “Overcoming Depression: A self-help guide using cognitive behavioral techniques” Robinson, London.

 

What is narrative therapy?

Narrative Therapy was co-developed by Michael White and David Epston.

Narrative therapy involves optimism even in the face of darkness. It assumes that clients have many resources, skills, values, abilities, beliefs, knowledge and so on that can help them reduce the influences of the problems they are struggling with in their lives. In narrative therapy the relationship between the therapist and the client is a collaborative one. Conversations are always interactive and are guided by the interests of the client. The narrative therapist is genuinely curious and asks exploratory questions. The stories (narratives) of a client’s life are central to understanding how narrative therapy works. Each client has a unique set of stories about their lives. There are stories about the past, present and future. There is always a social context in which the stories of one’s life are developed e.g culture. Embedded in the client’s stories are the interpretations and meanings they attach to various events and experiences. The meanings a client makes of their life are greatly influenced by their culture.  A client may have a story about themselves as being a “failure”. Such a label disempowers the client.

In narrative therapy exploration can lead to a preferred alternative, more positive or optimistic or hopeful story. During conversations between the therapist and client, the therapist searches for these alternative stories. These stories can open up new possibilities for living. Helping the client to construct  a preferred story (narrative) is one of the main tasks of the narrative therapist. In narrative therapy the therapist will ask questions of the client, and based on the answers, will ask further questions.

To learn more see the virtual home of narrative therapy in Australia

        https://www.dulwichcentre.com.au/what-is-narrative-therapy.html